VINCE NEIL ON PLAYING MOTLEY CRUE SONGS AS A SOLO ACT, “I LOVE THE FANS’ REACTIONS WHEN THEY HEAR THE SONGS”

Singer Vince Neil was a recent guest on Eddie’s SiriusXM show, Trunk Nation. Quotes from the interview appear below (as per blabbermouth.net).

On still performing Motley Crue songs live as a solo artist:

“It’s a cool thing, because I love Motley Crue, I love Motley Crue’s music, and I love singing, and I love the fans’ reactions when they hear the songs. Whether we’re playing in front of a thousand people or twenty thousand people, I can only see the front row anyway. So I’m happy for me and for the fans to be able to still hear that music after Motley Crue is finished.”

Talking about how he likes to insert deeper cuts into his solo set:

“Like [the] songs Red Hot and Piece Of Your Action, we didn’t have [them] in the set for a long time, and then I was, like, ‘Yeah, let’s just go ahead and let’s do this. Then we added Red Hot and we stopped doing it for a while, and then we just added it again…The old songs are… Motley didn’t play all these old songs, and I enjoy singing these old songs, so it’s fun for me and it’s fun for the band and it’s fun for the crowd.”

Neil’s solo band includes Dana Strum and Jeff Blando from Slaughter, along with drummer Zoltan Chaney.

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KXM’S VIDEO FOR “BREAKOUT” POSTED ONLINE

KXM, the band featuring dUg Pinnick of King’s X on vocals/bass, George Lynch of Lynch Mob/Dokken on guitars and Ray Luzier of Korn on drums, has released a new video for the song, Breakout, from their forthcoming album, Scatterbrain, which be released on March 17th. Watch it below.

To watch a clip of the title track, please click here.

Recorded over the span of ten days, every song on Scatterbrain was the result of a musical jam from all three members playing together in the same room.

Ray Luzier explains on the process, “We wanted to use the same formula as the 1st KXM record: book studio time, come in fresh every day with a new idea & run with it and not over think anything.” George Lynch described the sessions as Record-topia, “We showed up in the studio, camped out with a bunch of gear and let the tape roll. Just like the first album, no pre-production, no rehearsal, no pre-written songs.” dUg Pinnick adds, “The vibe was like a bunch of old friends having fun creating music like the previous record, nothing but fun!”

The track listing for Scatterbrain is:

1. Scatterbrain
2. Breakout
3. Big Sky Country
4. Calypso
5. Not a Single Word
6. Obsession
7. Noises In The Sky
8. Panic Attack
9. It’s Never Enough
10. True Deceivers
11. Stand
12. Together
13. Angel

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JUDGE DENIES DRUMMER BOBBY BLOZTER THE RIGHT TO USE THE RATT NAME

As previously reported, members of the band Ratt, have been in an ongoing dispute over ownership of the name.

In an exclusive Eddie Trunk news report, dated November 29th, 2016, Ratt members Stephen Pearcy (singer), Warren DiMartini (guitarist) and Juan Croucier (bassist) had won a judgment to the rights to the moniker and expelled drummer Bobby Blotzer from the partnership.

Blotzer, who also claimed ownership of the band name, and toured using it, while being the only original member of Ratt, filed a counter lawsuit against his former bandmates. Well, on February 3rd, the judge presiding over Blozter’s case has denied the drummer’s request for rights to the band’s name.

U.S. District Judge Dean D. Pregerson issued an order denying Blotzer’s request, writing in part:

“Although WBS relied upon a letter purportedly expelling Croucier from the Partnership in early 1997, prior to the assignment, that letter was signed by, and referred to the unanimous vote and consent of, only Blotzer and Pearcy. The Partnership Agreement, however, required the unanimous consent of all partners, other than the partner being expelled. By [Blotzer’s] own admission, DeMartini remained a member of the Partnership at all times. Blotzer and Pearcy could not, therefore, have expelled Croucier without DeMartini’s consent, of which there was no evidence.

In addition, Pearcy submitted a declaration stating that he never discussed Croucier’s expulsion from the RATT Partnership with Blotzer, never understood Croucier to have been expelled, and had no recollection of seeing the 1997 expulsion letter prior to this litigation. Pearcy’s declaration stated that the letter ‘is not the product of any agreement I reached with Robert Blotzer or anyone else.’

[Blotzer] did not file any written objection to the Pearcy declaration. Although [Blotzer’s] counsel did, at oral argument, suggest that Pearcy lacked credibility, [Blotzer] submitted no evidence that conflicted with or contradicted Pearcy’s statement. Indeed, as the court also noted, Blotzer himself took a position different than that advanced by WBS, stating in a deposition that Croucier voluntarily withdrew from the Partnership, not that the other members of the Partnership unanimously expelled Croucier. Now, on this motion for reconsideration, WBS argues that Croucier submitted evidence in bad faith and committed a fraud on this Court by intentionally ignoring proceedings in an earlier, 2002 state court action between Pearcy and WBS. WBS contends that this Court should have considered documents submitted in those proceedings, which, [Blotzer] asserts, establish that Croucier is collaterally estopped from challenging the validity of the assignment of the RATT marks to WBS.

[Blotzer’s] theory of fraud is not clear to the court. The 2002 judgment [Blotzer] submitted to the court does not discuss the composition of the RATT partnership and makes no mention of the 1997 assignment of the marks to WBS. [Blotzer] nevertheless argues that ‘[e]ven if the 2002 judgment did not specifically express that the transfer in 1997 was valid, the 2002 Judgment did reference and incorporated (sic) in the state court’s ruling. As part of their Rule 11 obligations, Croucier’s counsel had a duty . . . to investigate what the ruling and (sic) not present bad law to this Court.’ It is not apparent, however, what ‘bad law’ [Croucier] is alleged to have presented.”

The last time Blozter played a live show using the Ratt name was on December 29th, 2016 at Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort in Michigan. The show was was cancelled after the Michigan entertainment venue received a cease-and-desist letter from Blozter’s former bandmates.

In the interim, the official version of Ratt, now featuring Pearcy, DeMartini, Croucier and guitarist Carlos Cavazo (ex-Quiet Riot) is scheduled to make its first official return to the stage on February 11th at the Treasure Island Resort Casino in Welch, Minnesota.

additional source: blabbermouth.net

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OVERKILL RELEASE VIDEO FOR “GODDAMN TROUBLE”

Overkill have released an official video for the song, Goddamn Trouble, from their forthcoming album, The Grinding Wheel, which will be released on February 10th. Watch the clip below.

Singer Bobby “Blitz” Ellsworth said, “We hooked up again with Kevin Custer, the director behind the videos Armorist, Bitter Pill, Rattlesnake and Bring Me The Night. It was an ‘all-day’ event in the great state of New Jersey and Kevin shot two vids for us on that cold January day, Goddamn Trouble and Shine On. A long day but well worth it as he captured the metal chaos and energy. So hit ‘Play’ and get some ‘Trouble’.”

To listen to other songs from, The Grinding Wheel, click on the highlighted song titles:

Mean, Green, Killing Machine (lyric video)
Our Finest Hour (lyric video)

The Grinding Wheel track listing:

1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
2. Goddamn Trouble
3. Our Finest Hour
4. Shine On
5. The Long Road
6. Let’s All Go To Hades
7. Come Heavy
8. Red White And Blue
9. The Wheel
10. The Grinding Wheel

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SINGER GOEFF TATE STARS IN “THE BURNINGMORE DEATHS” COMING TO DVD AND DIGITAL FORMATS ON FEBRUARY 14th

On February 14thth, MVD Entertainment will release the feature film debut of Geoff Tate, former lead vocalist of the mega-platinum metal band Queensrÿche. Entitled The Burningmore Deaths, the horror film – written and directed by Jonathan Williams – is inspired by true events surrounding unsolved murders captured on security cameras during a production shoot of a Home Improvement TV show pilot.

Tate takes on the role of James Parrish, a man who allegedly killed his own wife and three children before disappearing without a trace. With the home now vacated and boarded up, a home improvement company gets permission to film the renovation process for a test pilot for a TV network, not knowing that Parrish had returned to take up residence once again in the derelict building. Bloody chaos ensues – and it’s all captured on camera. Watch a trailer below.

The Burningmore Deaths features an original score by Andrew Kadin with additional music by Dawn of Solace and Geoff Tate.

“I think I’ve always done it… In our own shows and with the way I present music,” said Tate. “It all has a bit of a stage acting bend to it. So this wasn’t really a stretch for me. It was just playing to a different audience, to a camera rather than a room full of people, but it’s the same thing. You play-act and you make stuff up and you present that like you would in a stage show. ”

The Burningmore Deaths will be available on all digital stores for download and also available on DVD in retail stores, the MVD Shop and on Amazon.

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GUITARIST JOE PERRY SAYS HE WOULD LIKE TO COVER SOME AC/DC SONGS WITH THE HOLLYWOOD VAMPIRES

Steve Baltin of Forbes spoke with Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry at the NAMM (National Association Of Music Merchants) show in Anaheim, California. Highlights from the Q&A appear below.

Steve Baltin: What does it mean to you to be getting an award named after Les Paul?

Joe Perry: It’s like anything that has to do with Les Paul. He’s arguably one of the most influential inventors of this last century, right up there with Leo Fender. He’s just an amazing guy, to be a musician, performer and technician, just brilliant. So anyway, the fact that’s got his name attached to this award, believe me, I never thought that would be possible. Cause you think about these things, especially when I wrote the book and I’m thinking back to when I first saw a Les Paul, first heard a Les Paul, and, to me, that was tantamount to an electric guitar, that was it. It was like the gold standard and finally, when I was able to have one in my hands, the same vehicle that I saw Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page using, first thing you do is realize, “I’m playing the same guitar, how come I don’t sound like that?” There’s a lot more that goes into it. Again, Les gave us a tool that gives us a voice so to get an award with his name on it it’s a real honor. Steven [Tyler] and I have a joke, we talk about it all the time, being the last band standing. I think it has to do with being the last man standing.

Baltin: Do you…get a new appreciation for Aerosmith [when] taking a break from it?

Perry: Aerosmith is like a ship, to steer it, to make it move, it’s a big deal. There’s five of us and it’s always been a democracy, so very often it’s not as fast on its feet as an outfit like the [Hollywood] Vampires. At the drop of a hat, somebody says there’s a gig tomorrow night, we can be there and that’s one of the great things about that band. Not only is everybody road dogs and we’ve all done it we do what matters and that’s the music. And the rest of it will work itself out. And it’s totally a different thing than in Aerosmith, where there are so many things, there are riders and all this other crap. But hey, there’s a certain amount of comfort you want if you’re gonna be able to be consistent in your performance.

Baltin: What are the Aerosmith songs you go back to again and again? For me, with all the hits it’s still Kings And Queens.

Perry: That’s one, I think albums are a mirror of what’s going on in the band at any given time. I look at it like it’s a river and the water is always changing, but it’s the bucket that you take out and look to see, it’s like a little statement to where the band is at. So those albums were when we were learning how to be recording artists and not just a live band. Those couple of records, Toys In The Attic and Rocks, were the records where we moved to that next level. We learned how to use a studio, how to write songs in the studio, cause by the time the second record was done we pretty much used up all of our repertoire of music that we had written and played and played and played and did these albums that were already done. So that was the first record, Toys In The Attic, and then every record after that it was like, “Gotta make another record.” We didn’t have any material and we had to write it. And then learning how to use the studio and figuring out, “Okay, we really don’t want the drums to sound like Led Zeppelin, we really don’t want the guitars to sound like Jimmy Page,” cause we managed to have our own sound and let’s do more of that. Those were the records we were trying to figure out what it was, it was really what Aerosmith was.

Baltin: What is one song you haven’t done yet for Vampires you’d love to do?

Perry: The list is enormous cause we’re basically a cover band, so there are so many. I don’t know what the theme will be on the next one, I don’t know if we’re gonna go to that same well, just cover songs from dead people, there are so many bands that are not the original band, so they’re not the same band, it widens the scope. I would like to play a couple of AC/DC songs, they’re alive and well. But in honor of Bon [Scott] not being here I guess we can get away with that. That’s one band and maybe a couple more Hendrix songs and some Zeppelin. There’s no Zeppelin anymore.

Read more at Forbes.

source: forbes.com

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